Anchor River State Recreation Area and Stariski State Recreation Site


Anchor Point History

The first written descriptions of the land and people of the Kenai Peninsula are found in the 1778 journals from the British sponsored expedition of Captain James Cook. According to legend, Anchor Point got its name when Captain Cook lost an anchor near the mouth of the river.

Homesteaders began to settle in the Anchor River area in the early 1900's. They came from Homer, to the South, and Kenai and Ninilchik, to the North, and survived by hunting, fishing, and farming. They were a hardy lot and many of them and their descendants still live in the area.

Wildlife abounds around the Anchor River, with moose, beaver, mink, bald eagles, a variety of ducks along the river, harbor seals, sea otters, and beluga whales near shore in the Cook Inlet.

Across the Cook Inlet from Anchor Point, three of seven volcanoes bordering the inlet can be seenó Mount Augustine to the South, then Mount Iliamna, and Mount Redoubt to the North. Mount Augustine's last eruption ended in March 2006; Mount Redoubt's latest eruption ended around July 2009. No eruption of Mount Iliamna has ever been recorded.

Anchor Point, where Anchor River State Recreation Area is located, is the most westerly point on the U.S. Highway System.

Stariski State Recreation Site is situated on a high bluff overlooking the Cook Inlet, offering spectacular views of Mount Augustine, Mount Iliamna, and Mount Redoubt. The park is five miles north of Anchor Point with nine individual campsites. This is a small, quiet campground away from the crowds. There is no fishing at Stariski SRS.


Fishing Information

The Anchor River is one of Alaska's premier fishing areas. Please consult current fishing regulations provided by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game for information on seasons, closures, limits, and methods and means before you wet your line.

The Anchor River supports runs of King, Silver, and Pink salmon, as well as Dolly Varden and Steelhead.

The King salmon run is the most popular fishery. The run begins in late May and peaks in the second week in June. Flies, spinners, and salmon eggs are the most popular methods for catching the king of salmon.

Dolly Varden begins running early in July and continues throughout the summer. Flies, spinners, and salmon eggs work best for catching this species of char.

Pink salmon runs begin in mid-July and extend into August. Larger runs of Pink salmon occur on even numbered years. Flies and spinners work best for catching these salmon.

Silver salmon begin running at the end of July and persist until the beginning of September. Salmon eggs, spinners, and flies are used for catching Silvers, with salmon eggs being the most popular.

Steelhead runs begin in late August and continue into October. This aggressive and prized fish is pursued by the hardiest of anglers with fly-fishing being the most popular and successful method.


* Camp in designated area only.

* Fires are restricted to the fire grates provided.

* Pets must be leashed and under control at all times.

* Please pay your camping fee within 30 minutes of selecting a site.

* ATV's are restricted to saltwater beaches only.

* Leave a clean camp - use dumpster's.

* Do not dump sewage or gray water on the ground or in the river - use dump stations in the area.

* Discharge of firearms and fireworks is not allowed.

* No cutting of live trees or shrubs. Collect only dead and down wood.

* Please respect private property.

* Quiet hours: 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.

For more information:

Alaska State Parks
Kenai Area Office

PO Box 1247
Soldotna, AK 99669
(907)262-5581

   

Emergency Contacts
State Park Rangers:
262-5581 (Soldotna) or 567-3367 (Ninilchik)
State Troopers: 262-4453 or 911
To report a fire: 262-5528 or 911


 Anchor Point is operated by Alaska Rec. Mgmt. (907) 522-8368 or (907) 748-2553.