Revegetation Program

The PMC leads Alaska in reclamation, erosion control, research, technology and knowledge transfer, and revegetation. Research priorities include the use of dormant seedlings to extend planting seasons, cost-effective methods of willow planting, and wetland ecosystem restoration. This program has gathered at least 275 plot-years of information from sites around the state, and developed 11 new cultivars and 33 natural "Selected Class" germplasms for release.The PMC maintains these collections, as well as the 9 cultivars developed by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Agriculture Research Service for use in revegetation and reclamation.

Revegetation Options

Revegetation can be achieved through natural reinvasion, enhanced, seeding, or the charged overburden processes. These processes can be used independently or in combination with each other. Which option is chosen often depends on your site characteristics and the level of management input that can be provided. Some of the more commonly used options are briefly addressed in the tabs below:

 

  • Natural Reinvasion
  • Enhanced
  • Seeding
  • Charged Overburden

Natural Reinvasion

Do nothing and allow for natural reinvasion.
This process is attractive because no management is involved.
It is slow, has unpredictable results and sometimes ineffective.

 

Natural Reinvasion 1 Natural Reinvasion 2

Enhanced Natural Reinvasion

This process requires a form of surface scarification and fertilizer.
It is not as slow as natural reinvasion but still has a relatively low success rate.

 

Natural Reinvasion 1

Standard Seeding With Native Species

This process is the most cost-effective method to revegetate an area where rapid results
and a high success rate are desired. It follows a logical sequence of surface preparation,
fertilizing and seeding.

 

Natural Reinvasion 1

Charged Overburden Veneer

This process involves spreading overburden (usually taken from a nearby worksite) over an
area to be revegetated. Seed, roots, nutrients, and microorganisms already present in the
soil constitute the ‘charge’ and are relied upon to establish vegetation.

 

Natural Reinvasion 1

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For More Information Contact:

Phil Czapla
Revegetation and Erosion Control Specialist
Phil.Czapla@alaska.gov
1-907-745-8747

 

 


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