Coastal Impact Assistance Program

CIAP Background

The Coastal Impact Assistance Program authorizes the distribution of $960 million to Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas producing states to mitigate the impacts of OCS oil and gas activities. CIAP was originally administered by the United States Department of Interior, Minerals Management Service (renamed Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE)) and was established by Section 384 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Act). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assumed administrative responsibility of CIAP on July 1, 2011.

CIAP funds are shared among six OCS producing states (Alabama, Alaska, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas) and their eligible coastal political subdivisions (CPSs). Per the Act, 65% of a state’s allocation goes directly to the state and 35 % goes directly to the eligible CPSs of the state. Alaska has eight eligible CPSs.

The Department of Natural Resources is the designated state agency that has the authority to represent and act for the state in dealing with U.S. FWS for CIAP purposes.


Allocation to Alaska

Alaska’s total CIAP allocation is $79,407,445.
• $27,792,606 (35%) is allocated directly to the eight eligible Alaska CPSs
• $51,614,839 (65%) is Allocation directly to the State


The CIAP Plan

The State has an approved Alaska CIAP Plan that describes the projects the State and CPSs will fund through CIAP and how the state will manage the funds.

BOEMRE approved the Alaska CIAP Plan February 4, 2011.

Alaska CIAP Plan (Note: see Appendix B-1 and B-2 for project descriptions)

PLEASE NOTE: The projects approved in the Alaska CIAP Plan will use all of the CIAP funds allocated to Alaska. There is no opportunity to present new CIAP projects at this time.


Alaska Legislation Affecting The Plan

The Alaska Legislature, through Senate Bill 75 (CSSB 75(FIN)) appropriated the direct-to-state funding as follows:
• Alaska Department of Natural Resources for state initiated projects: $23,067,581
• Alaska Department of Fish and Game for the Western Alaska Salmon Coalition’s Chum and Sockeye Genetic Identification Program: $1,373,070
Department of Commerce, Community, and Economic Development (Commerce) for an open solicitation from the public: $213,710,856
•Commerce for use by named municipalities and non-profit organizations: $9,340,520
This distribution is reflected in the Alaska CIAP Plan.


Authorized Uses of CIAP Funds

Per the Act all CIAP funds must benefit the natural coastal environment and be used for one or more of the following five authorized uses:

1. Projects and activities for the conservation, protection, or restoration of coastal areas, including wetlands.
2. Mitigation of damage to fish, wildlife, or natural resources.
3. Planning assistance and the administrative costs of complying with CIAP.
4. Implementation of a federally-approved marine, coastal or comprehensive conservation management plan.
5. Mitigation of the impact of OCS activities through funding of onshore infrastructure projects and public service needs.