Local Historic Preservation Plans

Many local jurisdictions have historic preservation plans that outline a community's preservation objectives and provide useful developmental history of the community. One requirement of the Certified Local Government program is for each government to develop a preservation plan prior to certification.

Creating your community's historic preservation plan

A local preservation plan can help a local government consider issues and opportunities related to historic preservation; identify important historic resources; develop goals, objectives and action strategies; and outline appropriate approaches to continued conservation, use and preservation of important places consistent with the comprehensive plan. As plans are prepared for a local community, the Office of History and Archaeology is available to review plans as a local community deems appropriate.

A good planning process should include the following steps and components:

Items in Planning
  • Developmental History: Authors should consult written histories, oral histories, maps, and other similar resources to create a sound description the development in the community being addressed.
  • Existing Conditions: Use accurate descriptions and maps to identify areas properties listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, significant cultural resources, areas that will experience development pressures, and the local preservation environment including programs, laws, and park
  • Needs: Identify needs, current and future, that pertain to the preservation of specific property and areas as well as legal changes that will better address preservation.
  • Goals, Objectives, and Strategies: Through public participation, goals, objectives and strategies are developed to further preservation related missions. Goals could address issues related to economic development, education, survey, resource protection and tourism to name a few.
  • Action Plan: Strategies should be prioritized and timeframes established to complete projects. Tasks should be assigned.
  • Funding Sources and Tools: Many organizations provide financial or technical assistance in the delivery of preservation related issues. These entities should be identified and their areas of expertise highlighted.
  • Legal Basis: Citations should be included for the appropriate federal, state and local laws that pertain to historic preservation related issues.