Broken Mammoth Archaeological Project - Credits and Further Reading

The Broken Mammoth Archaeological Project began in 1990 following the discovery of the Broken Mammoth site in 1989. The project was directed by Dr. Charles E. Holmes, Office of History & Archaeology. Investigations at the Broken Mammoth, Mead, and Swan Point sites have been sponsored by the Office of History & Archaeology and the University of Alaska Anchorage with support from the National Geographic Society and a 1991 National Science Foundation Research Grant (DPP-9112174). Special thanks to the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (Fairbanks) and the Alaska Division of Forestry (Delta Station) for logistical support, and to the many students and volunteers who have helped over the years.

Further reading:

Dixon, E. James
1993 Quest for the Origins of the First Americans. Academic Press, New York.

Hoffecker, John F., W. Roger Powers, and Ted Goebel
1993 The Colonization of Beringia and the Peopling of the New World. Science 259:46-52.

Holmes, Charles E.
1991 The Broken Mammoth Archaeological Project. Heritage Quarterly Newsletter of the Office of History and Archaeology, No. 48.

1992 Ancient Skin Sewing Needle found Near Delta Junction. Heritage Quarterly Newsletter of the Office of History and Archaeology, No. 53.

1996 Broken Mammoth. In: American Beginnings: the Prehistory and Paleoecology of Beringia, edited by Frederick H. West, pp. 312-318. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Holmes, Charles E., Richard VanderHoek and Thomas E. Dilley
1996 Swan Point. In: American Beginnings: the Prehistory and Paleoecology of Beringia, edited by Frederick H. West, pp. 319-323. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Holmes, Charles E. and David R. Yesner
1992 Investigating the Earliest Alaskans: the Broken Mammoth Archaeological Project. Arctic Research of the United States, Vol. 6, pp. 6-9.

Yesner, David R., Charles E. Holmes, and Kris J. Crossen
1992 Archaeology and Paleoecology of the Broken Mammoth Site, Central Tanana Valley, Interior Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene 9:53-57.