Historic Preservation Fund Grants

Ten percent of the annual Historic Preservation Fund grant to Alaska is for Certified Local Government projects. The Office of History and Archaeology solicits applications for projects, and the Alaska Historical Commission reviews them based on priorities it establishes for funding and makes recommendations to the State Historic Preservation Officer. Survey, inventory, preservation planning, National Register nomination, public preservation education, predevelopment, development and acquisition projects are eligible for program funds. When funds are available, a call for project proposals will be advertised. Keep an eye out under the What’s New section on our home page for calls for grant proposals.

On occasion, the Office of History and Archaeology has offered matching fund grants for predevelopment and development projects. These funds are available to assist owners of properties listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. When funds are available, a call for project proposals is advertised statewide. Keep an eye out under the What’s New section on our home page for calls for grant proposals.



What is the process for HPF grants?

The Alaska Office of History and Archaeology notifies all Certified Local Governments, specifically the chief elected official and cultural resources staff, when proposals are being sought for the CLG grants. The Alaska Historical Commission, the state historic preservation review board, annually establishes priorities for projects. A complete application includes a project description, work plan, budget, and information on how the local historic preservation commission will participate in the project.

When there are HPF development and predevelopment grant funds available, private owners, non-profit groups, businesses, Native and local government entities can apply. The owner of the property must be the applicant and is the official recipient of a grant award. The application calls for similar information as a CLG grant application, and specifically asks applicants to indicate how the project will follow The Secretary of the Interior Standards for Treatment of Historic Properties. The Alaska Historical Commission reviews the applications and makes recommendations to the State Historic Preservation Officer for funding.


What conditions are there for owners who accept federal preservation funds?

Owners who accept federal historic preservation funds agree to a covenant for a period of five to ten years stating that upon acceptance and use of the funds the property will not be intentionally changed so as to destroy its historic character. If the significant historic characteristics are knowingly destroyed, historic preservation funds the applicant received will have to be repaid. Owners also submit photographs of the property and work done with award funds to the Office of History and Archaeology that can be used for office programs and reports.