Public Access Altases

Notice: The Public Access Atlases have not been updated with current 17(b) trail and site easement, or land status information.

Extensive changes in land ownership and land management have occurred in Alaska over the past 20 years. Many areas which were previously open to general public use, may now be a federal conservation unit, state legislatively designated unit, or has been conveyed to a Native corporation or other private party. Public use of these areas may now be restricted or no longer available.

The original purpose of these atlases was to aid the public and the land owners in dealing with access issues.  However, recent changes in land ownership status and management have resulted in an increase of conflicts by the unauthorized use of land and resources.   For complete information on land ownership, contact the DNR Public Information Office, the State Recorders Office or the land owner.  Official land status records are also available at government offices listed in these atlases.  You may need to contact several offices and research different sources to obtain a complete picture of the area you are interested in.

All land owned by Native corporations is considered private land. It is your responsibility to obtain permission from the land owner before entering or using their land.  Except as specifically noted, it is generally closed to public use, just like any other private land.  Land owned by Native corporations which block access to public lands and waters are generally subject to specific, limited public easements.  Use of private land or use of a public easement for an unauthorized purpose without obtaining prior permission from the landowner may constitute trespass.

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Be aware that within state and federal parks, game refuges and sanctuaries, critical habitat areas, and "special use land" areas, there are additional restrictions on uses and activities allowed on the land.  Permits or special authorizations may be required for certain uses in those areas.

For information on generally allowed uses and activities on state land which is not in any special management category or status please go to the Public Information Office website at http://dnr.alaska.gov/commis/pic/.

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Cabins and tent camps, used for trapping, fishing, hunting, mining, and other purposes, are essential to the livelihood of many rural residents. Only in a real emergency should the public use someone else's cabin or camp without permission. A cabin or camp may appear abandoned, but the owner probably will return and will need everything in the cabin or camp during the coming season. Alaska's pioneers established the honorable tradition of respecting cabins and campsites. Please continue with this tradition.

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Other Publications

Public Atlas Atlases that have been published by the Division of Mining, Land and Water are available for sale (if available) or viewing at Public Information Centers, and for viewing only in the libraries of the areas covered by each atlas:

  • Kodiak Island Borough Public Access Atlas, published in March, 1997
  • Prince William Sound Public Access Atlas, published in March, 1997
  • Kenai Penisula Public Easement Atlas, published in December, 1993
  • Bristol Bay Easement Atlas, published in May, 1990
  • Northwest Alaska Easement Atlas - Nome Area, published in June, 1989
  • Northwest Alaska Easement Atlas - Kotzebue Area, published in May, 1988
  • Copper River Basin Easement Atlas, published in June, 1987

Contact the Public Information Center in your area, or your regional Division of Mining, Land & Water office for more information.

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